ACTS OF THE APOSTLES

ACTS OF THE APOSTLES

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1 In the first book, Theophilus, I dealt with all that Jesus did and taught

until the day he was taken up, after giving instructions through the holy Spirit to the apostles whom he had chosen.

He presented himself alive to them by many proofs after he had suffered, appearing to them during forty days 2 and speaking about the kingdom of God.

While meeting with them, he enjoined them not to depart from Jerusalem, but to wait for “the promise of the Father 3 about which you have heard me speak;

for John baptized with water, but in a few days you will be baptized with the holy Spirit.”

When they had gathered together they asked him, “Lord, are you at this time going 4 to restore the kingdom to Israel?”

5 He answered them, “It is not for you to know the times or seasons that the Father has established by his own authority.

6 But you will receive power when the holy Spirit comes upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, throughout Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”

When he had said this, as they were looking on, he was lifted up, and a cloud took him from their sight.

10 While they were looking intently at the sky as he was going, suddenly two men dressed in white garments stood beside them.

11 They said, “Men of Galilee, why are you standing there looking at the sky? This Jesus who has been taken up from you into heaven will return in the same way as you have seen him going into heaven.”

12 Then they returned to Jerusalem from the mount called Olivet, which is near Jerusalem, a sabbath day’s journey away.

13 When they entered the city they went to the upper room where they were staying, Peter and John and James and Andrew, Philip and Thomas, Bartholomew and Matthew, James son of Alphaeus, Simon the Zealot, and Judas son of James.

14 All these devoted themselves with one accord to prayer, together with some women, and Mary the mother of Jesus, and his brothers.

15 During those days Peter stood up in the midst of the brothers (there was a group of about one hundred and twenty persons in the one place). He said,

16 “My brothers, the scripture had to be fulfilled which the holy Spirit spoke beforehand through the mouth of David, concerning Judas, who was the guide for those who arrested Jesus.

17 He was numbered among us and was allotted a share in this ministry.

18 He bought a parcel of land with the wages of his iniquity, and falling headlong, he burst open in the middle, and all his insides spilled out. 7

19 This became known to everyone who lived in Jerusalem, so that the parcel of land was called in their language ‘Akeldama,’ that is, Field of Blood.

20 For it is written in the Book of Psalms: ‘Let his encampment become desolate, and may no one dwell in it.’ And: ‘May another take his office.’

21 Therefore, it is necessary that one of the men who accompanied us the whole time the Lord Jesus came and went among us,

22 beginning from the baptism of John until the day on which he was taken up from us, become with us a witness to his resurrection.”

23 So they proposed two, Joseph called Barsabbas, who was also known as Justus, and Matthias.

24 Then they prayed, “You, Lord, who know the hearts of all, show which one of these two you have chosen

25 to take the place in this apostolic ministry from which Judas turned away to go to his own place.”

26 8 Then they gave lots to them, and the lot fell upon Matthias, and he was counted with the eleven apostles. 

ACTS OF THE APOSTLES

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 [1-26] This introductory material (⇒ Acts 1:1-2) connects Acts with the Gospel of Luke, shows that the apostles were instructed by the risen Jesus (⇒ Acts 1:3-5), points out that the parousia or second coming in glory of Jesus will occur as certainly as his ascension occurred (⇒ Acts 1:6-11), and lists the members of the Twelve, stressing their role as a body of divinely mandated witnesses to his life, teaching, and resurrection (⇒ Acts 1:12-26).

2 [3] Appearing to them during forty days: Luke considered especially sacred the interval in which the appearances and instructions of the risen Jesus occurred and expressed it therefore in terms of the sacred number forty (cf ⇒ Deut 8:2). In his gospel, however, Luke connects the ascension of Jesus with the resurrection by describing the ascension on Easter Sunday evening (⇒ Luke 24:50-53). What should probably be understood as one event (resurrection, glorification, ascension, sending of the Spirit – the paschal mystery) has been historicized by Luke when he writes of a visible ascension of Jesus after forty days and the descent of the Spirit at Pentecost. For Luke, the ascension marks the end of the appearances of Jesus except for the extraordinary appearance to Paul. With regard to Luke’s understanding of salvation history, the ascension also marks the end of the time of Jesus (⇒ Luke 24:50-53) and signals the beginning of the time of the church.

3 [4] The promise of the Father: the holy Spirit, as is clear from the next verse. This gift of the Spirit was first promised in Jesus’ final instructions to his chosen witnesses in Luke’s gospel (⇒ Luke 24:49) and formed part of the continuing instructions of the risen Jesus on the kingdom of God, of which Luke speaks in ⇒ Acts 1:3.

4 [6] The question of the disciples implies that in believing Jesus to be the Christ (see the note on ⇒ Luke 2:11) they had expected him to be a political leader who would restore self-rule to Israel during his historical ministry. When this had not taken place, they ask if it is to take place at this time, the period of the church.

5 [7] This verse echoes the tradition that the precise time of the parousia is not revealed to human beings; cf ⇒ Mark 13:32; ⇒ 1 Thes 5:1-3.

6 [8] Just as Jerusalem was the city of destiny in the Gospel of Luke (the place where salvation was accomplished), so here at the beginning of Acts, Jerusalem occupies a central position. It is the starting point for the mission of the Christian disciples to “the ends of the earth,” the place where the apostles were situated and the doctrinal focal point in the early days of the community (⇒ Acts 15:2, 6). The ends of the earth: for Luke, this means Rome.

7 [18] Luke records a popular tradition about the death of Judas that differs from the one in ⇒ Matthew 27:5, according to which Judas hanged himself. Here, although the text is not certain, Judas is depicted as purchasing a piece of property with the betrayal money and being killed on it in a fall.

8 [26] The need to replace Judas was probably dictated by the symbolism of the number twelve, recalling the twelve tribes of Israel. This symbolism also indicates that for Luke (see ⇒ Luke 22:30) the Christian church is a reconstituted Israel.

ACTS OF THE APOSTLES

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OLD TESTAMENT 

THE GOSPELS

NEW  TESTAMENT 

BIBLE – NEW TESTAMENT

 

The Gospels


Saint Matthew    

Saint Mark  

Saint Luke    

Saint John

Acts

New Testament Letters


Romans    

1 Corinthians  

2 Corinthians    

Galatians  

Ephesians    

Philippians  

Colossians  

1 Thessalonians

 2 Thessalonians  

1 Timothy    

2 Timothy  

Titus    

Philemon  

Hebrews

The Catholic Letters


James  

1 Peter  

2 Peter  

1 John  

2 John  

3 John  

Jude  

Revelation

OLD TESTAMENT  

THE GOSPELS  

NEW  TESTAMENT 

OLD TESTAMENT 

THE GOSPELS

NEW  TESTAMENT 

MATTHEW – CHAPTER 1

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Chapter 1

1

1 2 The book of the genealogy of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.

2

Abraham became the father of Isaac, Isaac the father of Jacob, Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers.

3

Judah became the father of Perez and Zerah, whose mother was Tamar. Perez became the father of Hezron, Hezron the father of Ram,

4

Ram the father of Amminadab. Amminadab became the father of Nahshon, Nahshon the father of Salmon,

5

Salmon the father of Boaz, whose mother was Rahab. Boaz became the father of Obed, whose mother was Ruth. Obed became the father of Jesse,

6

Jesse the father of David the king. David became the father of Solomon, whose mother had been the wife of Uriah.

7

3 Solomon became the father of Rehoboam, Rehoboam the father of Abijah, Abijah the father of Asaph.

8

Asaph became the father of Jehoshaphat, Jehoshaphat the father of Joram, Joram the father of Uzziah.

9

Uzziah became the father of Jotham, Jotham the father of Ahaz, Ahaz the father of Hezekiah.

10

Hezekiah became the father of Manasseh, Manasseh the father of Amos, 4 Amos the father of Josiah.

11

Josiah became the father of Jechoniah and his brothers at the time of the Babylonian exile.

12

After the Babylonian exile, Jechoniah became the father of Shealtiel, Shealtiel the father of Zerubbabel,

13

Zerubbabel the father of Abiud. Abiud became the father of Eliakim, Eliakim the father of Azor,

14

Azor the father of Zadok. Zadok became the father of Achim, Achim the father of Eliud,

15

Eliud the father of Eleazar. Eleazar became the father of Matthan, Matthan the father of Jacob,

16

Jacob the father of Joseph, the husband of Mary. Of her was born Jesus who is called the Messiah.

17

Thus the total number of generations from Abraham to David is fourteen generations; from David to the Babylonian exile, fourteen generations; from the Babylonian exile to the Messiah, fourteen generations. 5

18

6 Now this is how the birth of Jesus Christ came about. When his mother Mary was betrothed to Joseph, 7 but before they lived together, she was found with child through the holy Spirit.

19

Joseph her husband, since he was a righteous man, 8 yet unwilling to expose her to shame, decided to divorce her quietly.

20

Such was his intention when, behold, the angel of the Lord 9 appeared to him in a dream and said, “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary your wife into your home. For it is through the holy Spirit that this child has been conceived in her.

21

She will bear a son and you are to name him Jesus, 10 because he will save his people from their sins.”

22

All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had said through the prophet:

23

11 “Behold, the virgin shall be with child and bear a son, and they shall name him Emmanuel,” which means “God is with us.”

24

When Joseph awoke, he did as the angel of the Lord had commanded him and took his wife into his home.

25

He had no relations with her until she bore a son, 12 and he named him Jesus.

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1 [ 1:1- 2:23] The infancy narrative forms the prologue of the gospel. Consisting of a genealogy and five stories, it presents the coming of Jesus as the climax of Israel’s history, and the events of his conception, birth, and early childhood as the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy. The genealogy is probably traditional material that Matthew edited. In its first two sections ( Matthew 1:2-11) it was drawn from Ruth 4:18-22; 1 Chron 1-3. Except for Jechoniah, Shealtiel, and Zerubbabel, none of the names in the third section ( Matthew 1:12-16) is found in any Old Testament genealogy. While the genealogy shows the continuity of God’s providential plan from Abraham on, discontinuity is also present. The women Tamar ( Matthew 1:3), Rahab and Ruth ( Matthew 1:5), and the wife of Uriah, Bathsheba ( Matthew 1:6), bore their sons through unions that were in varying degrees strange and unexpected. These “irregularities” culminate in the supreme “irregularity” of the Messiah’s birth of a virgin mother; the age of fulfillment is inaugurated by a creative act of God. Drawing upon both biblical tradition and Jewish stories, Matthew portrays Jesus as reliving the Exodus experience of Israel and the persecutions of Moses. His rejection by his own people and his passion are foreshadowed by the troubled reaction of “all Jerusalem” to the question of the magi who are seeking the “newborn king of the Jews” ( Matthew 2:2-3), and by Herod’s attempt to have him killed. The magi who do him homage prefigure the Gentiles who will accept the preaching of the gospel. The infancy narrative proclaims who Jesus is, the savior of his people from their sins ( Matthew 1:21), Emmanuel in whom “God is with us” ( Matthew 1:23), and the Son of God ( Matthew 2:15).

2 [1] The Son of David, the son of Abraham: two links of the genealogical chain are singled out. Although the later, David is placed first in order to emphasize that Jesus is the royal Messiah. The mention of Abraham may be due not only to his being the father of the nation Israel but to Matthew’s interest in the universal scope of Jesus’ mission; cf Genesis 22:18 “. . . . in your descendants all the nations of the earth shall find blessing.”

3 [7] The successor of Abijah was not Asaph but Asa (see 1 Chron 3:10). Some textual witnesses read the latter name; however, Asaph is better attested. Matthew may have deliberately introduced the psalmist Asaph into the genealogy (and in Matthew 1:10 the prophet Amos) in order to show that Jesus is the fulfillment not only of the promises made to David (see 2 Sam 7) but of all the Old Testament.

4 [10] Amos: some textual witnesses read Amon, who was the actual successor of Manasseh (see 1 Chron 3:14).

5 [17] Matthew is concerned with fourteen generations, probably because fourteen is the numerical value of the Hebrew letters forming the name of David. In the second section of the genealogy ( Matthew 1:6b-11), three kings of Judah, Ahaziah, Joash, and Amaziah, have been omitted (see 1 Chron 3:11-12), so that there are fourteen generations in that section. Yet the third ( Matthew 1:12-16) apparently has only thirteen. Since Matthew here emphasizes that each section has fourteen, it is unlikely that the thirteen of the last was due to his oversight. Some scholars suggest that Jesus who is called the Messiah ( Matthew 1:16b) doubles the final member of the chain: Jesus, born within the family of David, opens up the new age as Messiah, so that in fact there are fourteen generations in the third section. This is perhaps too subtle, and the hypothesis of a slip not on the part of Matthew but of a later scribe seems likely. On Messiah, see the note on Luke 2:11.

6 [18-25] This first story of the infancy narrative spells out what is summarily indicated in Matthew 1:16. The virginal conception of Jesus is the work of the Spirit of God. Joseph’s decision to divorce Mary is overcome by the heavenly command that he take her into his home and accept the child as his own. The natural genealogical line is broken but the promises to David are fulfilled; through Joseph’s adoption the child belongs to the family of David. Matthew sees the virginal conception as the fulfillment of Isaiah 7:14.

7 [18] Betrothed to Joseph: betrothal was the first part of the marriage, constituting a man and woman as husband and wife. Subsequent infidelity was considered adultery. The betrothal was followed some months later by the husband’s taking his wife into his home, at which time normal married life began.

8 [19] A righteous man: as a devout observer of the Mosaic law, Joseph wished to break his union with someone whom he suspected of gross violation of the law. It is commonly said that the law required him to do so, but the texts usually given in support of that view, e.g., Deut 22:20-21 do not clearly pertain to Joseph’s situation. Unwilling to expose her to shame: the penalty for proved adultery was death by stoning; cf Deut 22:21-23.

9 [20] The angel of the Lord: in the Old Testament a common designation of God in communication with a human being. In a dream: see Matthew 2:13, 19, 22. These dreams may be meant to recall the dreams of Joseph, son of Jacob the patriarch ( Genesis 37:5- 11:19). A closer parallel is the dream of Amram, father of Moses, related by Josephus (Antiquities 2,9,3; 212, 215-16).

10 [21] Jesus: in first-century Judaism the Hebrew name Joshua (Greek Iesous) meaning “Yahweh helps” was interpreted as “Yahweh saves.”

11 [23] God is with us: God’s promise of deliverance to Judah in Isaiah’s time is seen by Matthew as fulfilled in the birth of Jesus, in whom God is with his people. The name Emmanuel is alluded to at the end of the gospel where the risen Jesus assures his disciples of his continued presence,”. . . I am with you always, until the end of the age” ( Matthew 28:20).

12 [25] Until she bore a son: the evangelist is concerned to emphasize that Joseph was not responsible for the conception of Jesus. The Greek word translated “until” does not imply normal marital conduct after Jesus’ birth, nor does it exclude it.

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OLD TESTAMENT  – THE GOSPELS — NEW  TESTAMENT

GENESIS – INDEX AND CHAPTER 1

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Chapter 1

1

1 In the beginning, when God created the heavens and the earth,

2

2 the earth was a formless wasteland, and darkness covered the abyss, while a mighty wind swept over the waters.

3

Then God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light.

4 God saw how good the light was. God then separated the light from the darkness.

5

3 God called the light “day,” and the darkness he called “night.” Thus evening came, and morning followed – the first day.

6 Then God said, “Let there be a dome in the middle of the waters, to separate one body of water from the other.” And so it happened:

7

God made the dome, and it separated the water above the dome from the water below it.

8 God called the dome “the sky.” Evening came, and morning followed – the second day.

9

Then God said, “Let the water under the sky be gathered into a single basin, so that the dry land may appear.” And so it happened: the water under the sky was gathered into its basin, and the dry land appeared.

10 God called the dry land “the earth,” and the basin of the water he called “the sea.” God saw how good it was.

11

Then God said, “Let the earth bring forth vegetation: every kind of plant that bears seed and every kind of fruit tree on earth that bears fruit with its seed in it.” And so it happened:

12 the earth brought forth every kind of plant that bears seed and every kind of fruit tree on earth that bears fruit with its seed in it. God saw how good it was.

13

Evening came, and morning followed – the third day.

14 Then God said: “Let there be lights in the dome of the sky, to separate day from night. Let them mark the fixed times, the days and the years,

15

and serve as luminaries in the dome of the sky, to shed light upon the earth.” And so it happened:

16 God made the two great lights, the greater one to govern the day, and the lesser one to govern the night; and he made the stars.

17

God set them in the dome of the sky, to shed light upon the earth,

18 to govern the day and the night, and to separate the light from the darkness. God saw how good it was.

19

Evening came, and morning followed – the fourth day.

20 Then God said, “Let the water teem with an abundance of living creatures, and on the earth let birds fly beneath the dome of the sky.” And so it happened:

21

God created the great sea monsters and all kinds of swimming creatures with which the water teems, and all kinds of winged birds. God saw how good it was,

22 and God blessed them, saying, “Be fertile, multiply, and fill the water of the seas; and let the birds multiply on the earth.”

23

Evening came, and morning followed – the fifth day.

24 Then God said, “Let the earth bring forth all kinds of living creatures: cattle, creeping things, and wild animals of all kinds.” And so it happened:

25

God made all kinds of wild animals, all kinds of cattle, and all kinds of creeping things of the earth. God saw how good it was.

26 4 Then God said: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. Let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, the birds of the air, and the cattle, and over all the wild animals and all the creatures that crawl on the ground.”

27

God created man in his image; in the divine image he created him; male and female he created them.

28 God blessed them, saying: “Be fertile and multiply; fill the earth and subdue it. Have dominion over the fish of the sea, the birds of the air, and all the living things that move on the earth.”

29

God also said: “See, I give you every seed-bearing plant all over the earth and every tree that has seed-bearing fruit on it to be your food;

30 and to all the animals of the land, all the birds of the air, and all the living creatures that crawl on the ground, I give all the green plants for food.” And so it happened.

31

God looked at everything he had made, and he found it very good. Evening came, and morning followed – the sixth day.

 
1 [⇒ 1:1-⇒ 2:4a] This section introduces the whole Pentateuch. It shows how God brought an orderly universe out of primordial chaos.

2 [2] The abyss: the primordial ocean according to the ancient Semitic cosmogony. After God’s creative activity, part of this vast body forms the salt-water seas (⇒ Genesis 1:9-10); part of it is the fresh water under the earth (⇒ Psalm 33:7; ⇒ Ezekiel 31:4), which wells forth on the earth as springs and fountains (⇒ Genesis 7:11; ⇒ 8:2; ⇒ Proverb 3:20). Part of it, “the upper water” (⇒ Psalm 148:4; ⇒ Daniel 3:60), is held up by the dome of the sky (⇒ Genesis 1:6-7), from which rain descends on the earth (⇒ Genesis 7:11; ⇒ 2 Kings 7:2, ⇒ 19; ⇒ Psalm 104:13). A mighty wind: literally, “a wind of God,” or “a spirit of God”; cf ⇒ Genesis 8:1.

3 [5] In ancient Israel a day was considered to begin at sunset. According to the highly artificial literary structure of ⇒ Genesis 1:1-⇒ 2:4a, God’s creative activity is divided into six days to teach the sacredness of the sabbath rest on the seventh day in the Israelite religion (⇒ Genesis 2:2-3).

4 [26] Man is here presented as the climax of God’s creative activity; he resembles God primarily because of the dominion God gives him over the rest of creation.

1. 23. 4. 5. 6789. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 

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39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 4647484950.

OLD TESTAMENT  –  THE GOSPELS  –  NEW TESTAMENT

NEW TESTTAMENT

The Gospels


Saint Matthew    

Saint Mark  

Saint Luke    

Saint John

Acts

New Testament Letters


Romans    

1 Corinthians  

2 Corinthians    

Galatians  

Ephesians    

Philippians  

Colossians  

1 Thessalonians

 2 Thessalonians  

1 Timothy    

2 Timothy  

Titus    

Philemon  

Hebrews

The Catholic Letters


James  

1 Peter  

2 Peter  

1 John  

2 John  

3 John  

Jude  

Revelation

OLD TESTAMENT  

THE GOSPELS  

NEW  TESTAMENT 

OLD TESTAMENT 

THE GOSPELS

NEW  TESTAMENT 

THE BIBLE – OLD TESTAMENT

THE BIBLE – OLD TESTAMENT


The Pentateuch


GENESIS –  EXODUS  –  LEVITICUS  –  NUMBERS  –  DEUTERONOMY  –  JOSHUA   –  JUDGES   –  RUTH   

The Historical Books


1 SAMUEL  –  2 SAMUEL  –  1 KINGS  –  2 KINGS  –  1 CHRONICLES  – 2 CHRONICLES  –  EZRA  –  NEHEMIAH  –  TOBIT  –  JUDITH  –  ESTHER  –  1 MACCABEES  –  2 MACCABEES 

The Wisdom Books


JOB  –  PSALMS  –  PROVERBS  – 

ECCLESIASTES  –  THE SONGS OF SONGS  –

 THE BOOK OF WISDOM – SIRACH

The Prophetic Books


 ISAIAH – JEREMIAH   

LAMENTATIONS  –  BARUCH  – EZEKIEL – DANIEL 

 HOSEA – JOEL  AMOS – OBADIAH – JONAH

MICAH– NAHUM  –  BAKKUK – ZEPHANIAH  

HAGGAI  –  ZECHARIAH  – MALACHI 

OLD TESTAMENT

THE GOSPELS 

NEW  TESTAMENT 

ANEXA PRODUCCIONES S.L.